Author: Pamela Cross

My partner and I are common law. Do I have the same rights as a married person?

woman holding a little boy

Many women in common-law relationships believe they have exactly the same legal rights as women who are married. While there are many commonalities, there are some important differences, especially with respect to the way in which property is divided if

Posted in For women, Frequently asked questions Tagged with: , , ,

Case law: The costs of unwillingness to settle

hands on a book

In Jackson v Mayerle (2016 ONSC 1556), Justice Pazaratz has written another colourful decision, this time in a case where the mother refused to accept a number of offers to settle presented by the father and, after a 36-day trial

Posted in Case law Tagged with:

What is spousal support and am I eligible?

woman holding a little boy

The goal of spousal support is to encourage the financial independence of both spouses as appropriate in the circumstances of the relationship. For example, where one spouse stayed at home to raise the children or had to change jobs frequently

Posted in For women, Frequently asked questions Tagged with:

If I leave my partner, how will our property be divided?

thoughtful young woman

Property division for people who are married Marriage is considered to be a partnership, with each spouse making equal, if different, contributions and sharing equally in the family’s property if the partnership ends. This includes property acquired during the years

Posted in For women, Frequently asked questions Tagged with: , ,

Case law: “Marriage-like” relationships, spousal support and the division of assets

hands on a book

Kneller v Greenwood 2015 BCSC 1410, a British Columbia case, explores what elements must be present for a relationship to be considered “marriage-like” for the purposes of division of family assets and spousal support. While there are differences between the

Posted in Case law Tagged with:

How can I support a client who has left a forced marriage?

Forced marriage is a practice in which a marriage takes place without the free consent of either or both of the people getting married. Arranged marriage can appear similar to forced marriage, inasmuch as family members are involved in selecting

Posted in For service providers, Frequently asked questions Tagged with:

Basic facts about marriage and divorce

People must be at least 18 years of age to marry in Ontario. People as young as 16 years of age can marry if they have the written consent of both sets of parents. People of the same sex can

Posted in For service providers, For women Tagged with: ,

What is Ontario doing to address violence against Indigenous women?

woman's hand holding a child's hand

Indigenous communities in Ontario have worked collaboratively with the provincial government to develop Walking Together: Ontario’s Long-Term Strategy to End Violence Against Indigenous Women. Why? The strategy is built on the recognition that First Nation, Metis and Inuit women in

Posted in Current events, New resources Tagged with: , , ,

My ex-partner is using family court to continue harassing me. Is this legal bullying?

thoughtful young woman

One particular example of the ongoing abuse many women experience when they leave their partner is legal bullying, especially in family court. This abuse/bullying can take many forms. One of the most common is that the abuser decides to represent

Posted in For women, Frequently asked questions Tagged with: ,

Case law: Consequences for ongoing lack of disclosure

hands on a book

In Manchanda v Thethi 2016 ONSC 3776, Justice Myers begins his decision in this case about financial disclosure by asking: “When is enough, enough?” It is easy to see why he posed this question, as there had been more than

Posted in Case law Tagged with: , ,