Category: Frequently asked questions

Are accommodations are available at family court for a woman who has PTSD?

thoughtful young woman

The courts, like all government and public institutions and agencies, are required to comply with Ontario’s Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, which is intended to ensure that all people with disabilities have full and equal access to all public

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How can I co-parent safely with an abusive ex-partner?

mother holding daughter who looks content

To maintain their control, abusers often seek shared custody of the children when the relationship ends. Today’s Parent interviewed Luke’s Place Legal Director, Pamela Cross, and other Canadian experts on ways to co-parent with an abusive-ex-partner. These include: Making a

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What is the Hague Convention and how can it help if my ex-partner takes our children out of Canada?

woman's hand holding a child's hand

The Hague Convention is a tool to assist in having children returned who have been wrongfully removed from one jurisdiction that has signed the Convention to another that has also signed it. It is an international treaty, the full name

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How should I work with VWAP?

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If you are a woman’s advocate who focuses on family law issues, it’s helpful to connect clients to your local Victim Witness Assistance Program (VWAP) if an abusive partner is facing criminal charges. Keep in mind that: VWAP workers are

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What is intersectionality and how does it impact my work?

many hands reaching in

Understanding intersectionality is important if we are to provide the best possible services to women. Especially for those of us from the dominant culture, learning about intersectionality, power, privilege and oppression is a lifelong process. What is intersectionality? The word

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How can I manage the impact of calling CAS about a client’s children?

mom consoling toddler girl

This is the second of two posts on reporting to child protection. The first explored your duty to report. The woman’s response A woman who learns that her children are under investigation by child welfare may have many different feelings.

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What is my duty to report to child protection authorities?

woman holding a little boy

This is the first of two posts on reporting to child protection. Next week, we’ll look at how to manage the impact of making a report. You will be confronted, from time to time, with situations where you may have

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What are the rights of grandparents who want access to their grandchildren?

mother holding daughter who looks content

Bill 34, Children’s Law Reform Amendment Act (Relationship with Grandparents), received Royal Assent and came into effect in December 2016. This legislation makes changes to the CLRA provisions with respect to the rights of grandparents to custody and/or access of

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What can be done when bail conditions conflict with family law orders?

woman's hand holding a child's hand

When someone is charged with a criminal offence, they are generally kept in custody until a bail hearing can be held. At this hearing, the court will determine whether the accused can be released, usually with a number of conditions

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What do I need to know to support women whose partners have sexually assaulted them?

thoughtful young woman

Intimate partner sexual abuse/violence is poorly understood and under-recognized, both by the women who experience it and those who provide services to them. And yet, in Canada in 2011, 17% of sexual assault reported to the police were committed by

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